Skip to content

Sour milk and pickled fish!

As so often before, I’ve been remiss in keeping this blog up to date.

My current project is a YA novel based on the Icelandic saga of Gisli. It’s all betrayal and revenge. Because I have to follow the story closely in many respects, I’m  keeping a timeline of where various characters are at different times in the plot. Not as easy as it might be!

I also know far  more about weaving and the kind of dairy products unfamiliar to my supermarket.

Advertisements

More reviews!

From CityParent magazine:

Zombie Elementary: The Real Story

By Howard Whitehouse

Even a Grade 4 student can be a Zombie hunter, at least that’s what Larry Mullet has become since a classmate tried to eat him. Hilariously told interview-style as a record of the real story, readers will learn a lot about zombies and in particular, zombie cheerleaders. This book is splattered with life-or-death comedy. Ages 9 to 11 – Publisher Tundra Books – $16.99

A nice review from Mediatron:

“Larry Mullet is a fourth grader who spends his time playing baseball, complaining about cafeteria food, not really reading or studying, and hanging out with his super-intelligent best friend, Jermaine. When he is attacked by a classmate, Larry doesn’t know what to think because his parents don’t let him watch horror movies, but Jermaine quickly surmises that there is a zombie apocalypse occurring – so Larry and his friends become zombie hunters!

Zombie Elementary: The Real Story is a great, action-packed read for kids and adults alike. The characters are likable and it’s not difficult to tell them apart, although I don’t think it ever says how old they are so I had some concerns about how age-appropriate this all was (as well as how long it was).

The text is broken up by cute “Zombie Tips” and interjections by the person interviewing Larry. The humor is not overdone – there are some common jokes, like misunderstanding “big” words, oblivious adults, and allusions to other works in the genre. Some parents may want to read the story first if they are concerned about the age-appropriateness “almost-cusswords,” gore/violence, or other themes that are typical of the horror genre.”

Chappaqua!

Isn’t that a great name? It’s a Mohegan word for ‘Very clean white people with good dentistry and no visible tatoos live here.’

Wonderful book festival, great organisers. I was lucky enough to share space with Carol Weston, who writes for girls of ten or thereabouts. She has the same plan as me, meaning she spots a potential reader walking by, and yells out to them to come over.

Sold all copies of ‘Zombie Elementary’ and ‘The Strictest School in the World’ and a bunch of the others. A great day –  I hope they ask me back!

Chappaqua Children’s Book Festival

I’m appearing at the Chappaqua Children’s Book Festival on Saturday, Sept 27th, signing books and chatting to kids and parents. Hoping to shift lots of ‘Zombie Elementary’ and my four other Middle Grade fantasy books:

http://www.ccbfestival.org/

Just here to help —-

I often feature the names of my friends and their kids in my books. Jeff Wasileski now says, “My life is now complete. I’m a character (albeit a minor one) in a zombie novel.”

There you go, Jeff!

A Four Star Review

New review on Goodreads from Lindsey Lewis. Four of them star thingies:

“Larry Mullet is a fourth grader who spends his time playing baseball, complaining about cafeteria food, not really reading or studying, and hanging out with his super-intelligent best friend, Jermaine. When he is attacked by a classmate, Larry doesn’t know what to think because his parents don’t let him watch horror movies, but Jermaine quickly surmises that there is a zombie apocalypse occurring – so Larry and his friends become zombie hunters!

Zombie Elementary: The Real Story is a great, action-packed read for kids and adults alike. The characters are likable and it’s not difficult to tell them apart, although I don’t think it ever says how old they are so I had some concerns about how age-appropriate this all was (as well as how long it was).

The text is broken up by cute “Zombie Tips” and interjections by the person interviewing Larry. The humor is not overdone – there are some common jokes, like misunderstanding “big” words, oblivious adults, and allusions to other works in the genre. Some parents may want to read the story first if they are concerned about the age-appropriateness “almost-cusswords,” gore/violence, or other themes that are typical of the horror genre.”

‘Zombie Elementary’ — outbreak today!

It’s out!

“Larry Mullet is your typical fourth grader. He’s not the biggest kid or the smartest kid or the best looking kid. He rides his bike, plays baseball, takes the school bus, avoids cafeteria food, and–oh yeah, he’s a zombie hunting expert — Hilariously told interview-style as a record of the REAL story, and peppered with zombie tips and facts, zombie cheerleaders and plenty of gore, this book will be a surefire hit for anyone interested in a ghoulishly good life-or-death comedy.”

http://www.tundrabooks.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9781770496088